TOP 10 BENEFICIOS DE APRENDER OTROS IDIOMAS


Aprender un segundo (o tercero, o cuarto) idioma puede implicar muchos beneficios positivos, tanto para tu salud, como para tu vida personal y profesional. Entre los beneficios de saber más de un idioma, a continuación son nuestros picks para los top 10 motivos.

  1. Fortaleza memoria
  2. Puede retrasar el desarrollo de Alzheimer y demencia
  3. Es una ventaja competitiva en el mercado laboral
  4. Puede aumentar tu CI y tu capacidad intelectual en general
  5. Incrementa confianza y la habilidad de tomar decisiones
  6. Facilita el turismo y enriquece los viajes a otros países
  7. Puede incrementar tu capacidad de multi-task (hacer varias tareas al mismo tiempo)
  8. Te impulsa a analizar y entender mejor tu lengua materna
  9. Te cambia la perspectiva y te abre la mente
  10. Te permite a conectarte con otras culturas y otras comunidadesglobe flagsFUENTES: http://examinedexistence.com/12-benefits-of-learning-a-foreign-language-2/      http://www.ef.com.es/blog/general/10-ventajas-de-aprender-un-idioma/

The advantages of being bilingual


the results are in…bilingual is better!

The most significant advantage which has been reported recently must be the fact that “bilingual patients developed dementia 4.5 years later than the monolingual ones.” This was the outcome of a research lead by Dr Thomas Bak. It also concluded that “bilingual switching between different sounds, words, concepts, grammatical structures and social norms constituted a form of natural brain training, which was likely to be more effective than any artificial brain training programme”. For further details, read BBC’s article Speaking a second language may delay dementia. The full research paper can be bought here.Bilingualism has also been found to enhance a child’s working memory as shown by a research conducted at the University of Granada under the supervision of Ellen Bialystok.  The “working memory includes the structures and processes associated with the storage and processing of information over short periods of time.” You can read more about this in the article Bilingual children have a better “working memory” than monolingual childrenIn their article Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter The social network Verbalisti  write that “the bilingual experience improves the brain’s so-called executive function — a command system that directs the attention processes that we use for planning, solving problems and performing various other mentally demanding tasks.”Bilinguals are better at multi-tasking. “Children who grow up learning to speak two languages are better at switching between tasks than are children who learn to speak only one language” as explained in Bilingual Children Switch Tasks Faster than Speakers of a Single Language

Bilingualism makes you more open-minded and sensitive to others:  “bilinguals have an enhanced awareness of other people’s points of view, born from their deeper understanding, from an early age, that some people have a different perspective.” This probably makes bilinguals better managers as well as stated in the Financial Times article The Multilingual Dividend

Another study found that bilingualism enhances your listening ability. It showed that in a noisy environment bilinguals are “better at detecting the different sounds, therefore enhancing attention.” Read more in the article Study Indicates Bilinguals are Better Listeners (Literally).

Bilingual children are less easily distractedJudy Willis MD, a neurologist, teacher and author states that “compared to monolinguals, the bilingual children develop greater attention focus, distraction resistance, decision-making judgment and responsiveness to feedback”  and that “research supports encouraging parents to retain use of their native language in the home” in her article Neuroscience and the Bilingual Brain.

If you grow up as a bilingual you are often also bicultural. In his article Advantages of Being Bicultural  Prof François Grosjean lists the benefits as “having a greater number of social networks, being aware of cultural differences, taking part in the life of two or more cultures, being an intermediary between cultures” as well as having “greater creativity and professional success”.


How-the-brain-benefits-from-being-bilingual

 

ARTICLE SOURCE: http://multilingualparenting.com/2014/01/22/bilingual-is-better-the-advantages-of-speaking-more-than-one-language/

ARTICLE AUTHOR: © Rita Rosenback 2014

INFOGRAPHIC SOURCE: www.BHLingual.com

An Englishman’s struggles with language abroad


I started travelling late in 2009 and like a lot of Englishmen I had had very little experience with foreign languages, especially when compared to other Europeans. There isn’t an emphasis on learning languages in the UK like in other countries. Also, I would be lying if I said I didn´t have a slightly bullish attitude to foreign languages, in that I expected everyone else to speak enough English for me to get by. Travelling throughout India I found communication to be a mixed bag. Most people spoke good English in the southern states (it is the official language) but up north it was either very broken or nonexistent. Getting about wasn’t too hard but it was a shame that due to my lack of Hindi I couldn’t form proper friendships with a lot of the great Indians I met. taj

Last March my wife and I holidayed in Japan and it was the first time I came across such a definitive language barrier. The Japanese were wonderfully polite and you could see that they wanted to help when we asked or enquired, but such distinct and different cultures and languages really did stop any true connection through speaking to one another. As you can imagine there was plenty of body language and pointing from our end and plenty of awkward, polite smiles and bowing from theirs!

taj 2 An impression I got from experiencing India and Japan, to some degree, was that they didn’t expect foreign travelers to understand their languages. That didn’t make it any easier getting around, but there was an: “Ok, so I can’t understand you, you can’t understand me, let’s work this out the best we can” attitude that helped.

Coming to Argentina has been by far the biggest eye opener in the language stakes. My wife is Argentine but we never talk in Spanish and so I came to Argentina with very little Spanish vocabulary. I have been fortunate because my wife’s family all speak English well enough, but of course tend to talk Spanish when we are together socially. My bullish attitude of expecting everyone to speak English around me has been well and truly shot down!

I have so far struggled to pick up Spanish which has made it difficult at times. I get the impression that there is an expectation to know Spanish when you want to engage with Argentines (and rightly so!) and so understanding conversational Spanish is all the more important.taj 3

What I’ve learnt when on the road is that if you want to travel and just do the tourist traps then a limited understanding of that country’s language will get you by, just barely. But, just doing the tourist traps means that you are missing a big part of travelling. Going off the beaten track is how to experience a country’s true culture and people, and this requires you to put effort into learning their language.

Adam

La importancia de saber hablar idiomas para viajar


Claro, el diccionario puede ayudarte, pero…no te parece mejor hablar la lengua del país al cual estas viajando?

 “Please, could you tell me how to get to….”

Viajar es descubrir cosas nuevas, aprender y cambiar de cultura. Si hablamos su idioma la gente va a ser mas amable y también va a ser mas fácil conocer personas y conversar con ellas.

Preguntar por un cafecito en Paris: « bonjour, je vais prendre un café s’il vous plaît », encontrar una dirección en Nueva York o Londres: « please, can you help me, I’m looking for … » o  averiguar un precio en Rio de Janeiro: « quanta despesas isto por favor », son frases de todos los dias.

Llegar a una nueva ciudad es siempre difícil, no conocemos las calles, tampoco los transportes y el dinero es diferente… Todo eso es mucho mas complicado si es que no sabemos el idioma.

Integrarte social y culturalmente

Además, vas a disfrutar mas de tu viaje porque vas a poder participar en las conversaciones de tus amigos o compañeros de trabajo, vas a poder entender lo que dicen y no quedarte en un rincón. Puedes entender lo que se dice en las calles, en las noticias de televisión, ir al cine o leer libros como si fueras un real habitante de la ciudad. Vas a vivir la vida real del país, social y culturalmente.

En  fin, vas a poder ser independiente, pasear y charlar sin ayuda de alguien que te guíe o traduzca. Todo esto es muy importante durante un viaje, para realizar tus deseos y disfrutar al máximo, porque vas a poder hacer lo que quieras y sin necesidad de quedarte en tu casa con temor de salir por no saber como comunicarte.

Hablar el idioma del país donde vas a viajar, mejorará tu experiencia!


How to Avoid the Dreaded Comma Splice



semicolonPirates have nasty attitudes, this is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

What’s wrong with this sentence? Most style manuals agree that there is a problem here. When two independent clauses are connected with a comma without a conjunction, a comma splice is the result. An independent clause is a clause that can stand alone as a sentence. There are several ways to resolve this situation. The easiest way to fix the problem is to separate the two clauses into two sentences.

Pirates have nasty attitudes. This is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

Another way to resolve this problem would be to combine the two clauses with a conjunction such as or, but, or and. The addition of the conjunction makes one of the clauses dependent on the other.

Pirates have nasty attitudes, but this is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

A third way to fix the problem is to use a semicolon. This is only possible if the clauses are independent. Semicolons are frequently misused so be careful with them.

Pirates have nasty attitudes; this is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

For a clear and succinct description of how to use a semicolon, visit The Oatmeal

 

 

Shopping in Buenos Aires


calleflorida   Whether you just came to Buenos Aires for a short vacation or whether your visit to Buenos Aires is part of a longer journey, it is definitely a good place to go shopping and get your money’s worth. If you just arrived in Buenos Aires, you are probably spending some time in the neighborhood of Palermo. Just walking around this neighborhood you are likely to encounter loads of stores that offer everything from jewelry to jeans. If you happen to be there during the weekend, make sure to check out Plaza Serrano where every weekend the streets turn into a small, open air shopping mall. Moreover, all the bars that at night allow you to enjoy nicely chilled Quilmes convert  into small markets during the day. You can find clothes and jewelry here that will definitely be cheaper than in a normal brand store. If you are in Buenos Aires a bit longer, this is perhaps not the place you want to go. So now you are asking yourself, “Where then should I go shopping?” Ask in any hotel or hostel and most likely they will tell you to try your luck on Florida Street. Which is very nice to see and is the closest that you will find to a “European” style shopping street. The street is closed for traffic and so you can easily shop at your own pace and enjoy looking at whatever it is you are looking for. However, that being said, it is worth considering just sticking to looking at things and not buying it there. It won’t be a surprise that to find the best possible shopping for the best price, go where the locals go. In this category there are  two options that you might want to consider, depending on how much you want to buy and  how long you are staying in Buenos Aires. The easiest option would be to go to Avenida Cabildo. This street is easily accessible from Subte linea D and takes you right from Plaza Italia or Palermo to the heart of the Porteno’s shopping street. Leave the Subte at station Juramento and you will find yourself surrounded by stores and the more familiar food chains. You will also notice that there won’t be as many tourists hanging around  there, although that’s definitely not the only reason to go.
In case you are staying for a bit longer, maybe to learn some Spanish before starting your travels throughout South America, there is one other place that might be worth visiting. The name is La Avellaneda and that is where you will find good quality clothes for an incredibly low price. It is easily accessible since you can take the Metrobus that leaves from Palermo station and which will take you just a couple of blocks away from where you’ll need to be. The only catch is that to get a cheap price in general you will have to buy at least a couple of items in the same store. But no worries, in general you just have to buy 3 articles of clothing in the same store, which is often still cheaper then buying just 1 article on Florida Street.
So if you are not afraid to explore a little bit and are looking to buy good quality clothing for traveling, or if you are just looking for something to take back home, Buenos Aires will definitely serve you well.

Lunfardo


A los habitantes de Buenos Aires se le conoce mayormente como porteños, por la influencia del puerto en el desarrollo de esta cuidad. Ellos utilizan con frecuencia una jerga peculiar conocida como “lunfardo”, la cual surge de la fusión de lenguas, conocimientos y costumbres, traídas por los inmigrantes. Esta forma de hablar consiste en deformar el propio castellano, tomando palabras de algunos dialectos italianos y de otras lenguas, para luego adaptarlas en un nuevo idioma.

Es un leguaje dinámico y lleno de vida ya que se nutre constantemente de expresiones circunstanciales o improvisadas, renovándose constantemente. Al igual que el tango , nace en el ambiente marginal de los barrios pobres, debido a la convivencia forzada entre el gran caudal de inmigrantes que llegaron durantes las primeras décadas del siglo XX y la población local. Hoy se ha expandido a todos los niveles sociales y es cotidianamente utilizado en diversos ámbitos y situaciones. Lo podemos escuchar frecuentemente en los tangos, en los medios de comunicación y en los escritores más importantes de este país. Hay que mantener completa atención a la hora de escuchar hablar a un porteño, pues su español podría ser bastante complicado. He aquí varios ejemplos…

Algunas expresiones características del español rioplatense:
Opiniones favorables sobre una persona
• “Tiene onda”
• “Es re lindo/a”
• “Es copado/a”

Opiniones negativas sobre una persona
• “Es re mala onda”
• “No me cabe”
• “No me lo/a banco”

¡Ojo con los gestos! – Dictionary of Porteños’ Gestures


Cuando nos comunicamos, no sólo usamos las palabras; también hacemos gestos que pueden tener tanto significado como lo que decimos. Algunos son universales (como por ejemplo el pulgar para arriba), otros significan diferentes cosas en diferentes lugares. Acá, te enseñamos algunos gestos muy útiles para entender a los porteños.

When we talk, we use more than just words. We also do gestures that can be as meaningful as the words we say. Some of them are universal (such us “thumbs up”), some others mean different things in different places.
People from Buenos Aires are known for “speaking with their hands”. You might feel that we are making senseless chaotic movements but many of them are very meaningful and clear among locals.
Here, some of them.

 

 

¡Ojo! – Be careful!/Watch out!
[Pull down your lower eyelid with your index finger.]

 

 

¡Ni la más pálida idea! – I don’t know./I have no clue.[The chin flick: tilt your head back a bit and sweep the back of your fingers forward from under your chin.]

 


¡Ma sí, andá (a cagar)! – Get outta here!
[Throw your arm back toward your head.]

 

 

Montoncito – What the hell are you talking about?!/Just who do you think you are? [Bring all of your fingers and your thumb together with your hand pointing upward. Move your hand up and down at the wrist.]

 

 

¡Hambre! – You’re totally in the dark, out of it. You don’t know what time it is. [Bite your lower lip with your upper teeth and say: “mmmh!”]

 

 

Fuente: http://www.eniedespaniol.com.ar/blog/44/ojo-con-los-gestos-dictionary-of-portenos-gestures

20 de enero: 5º aniversario de lvstudio palermo, nuestra segunda oficina!!


20 de enero: 5º aniversario de lvstudio palermo, nuestra segunda oficina!! (ENGLISH VERSION BELOW)
Gracias comunidad LV por apoyarnos. Ya pasaron 5 años de nuestra segunda oficina en Palermo y diez desde que comenzamos en Buenos Aires y vamos creciendo de a poquito, con paso firme. Ojalá que las metas de cada uno de uds. también se hayan cumplido, y que hayan logrado comunicarse en inglés, español, francés, o portugués en sus viajes de placer, de trabajo o exámenes!
Esperamos verlos nuevamente en algún evento de lvstudio o en clase! Até mais! Hasta pronto! See you soon! A bientôt!

(IN ENGLISH)
January 20, 2013: 5th anniversary of lvstudio palermo, our second office!!
Thank you LV community for supporting us. It has been 5 years now since we opened our second office in Palermo, and 10 since we started, and we’ve grown little by little, at a steady pace. We sincerely wish that each of you have also fulfilled your goals, and have succeeded in communicating in English, Spanish, French, or Portuguese on your trips for pleasure, business, or on your exams!
We look forward to seeing you again soon at lvstudio or in class!
Até mais! Hasta pronto! See you soon! A bientôt!

lvstudio palermo, buenos aires: clases de inglés, clases de portugués, clases de francés con profesores nativos. Spanish lessons in Argentina

lvstudio palermo, buenos aires: clases de inglés, clases de portugués, clases de francés con profesores nativos. Spanish lessons in ARgentina