An Englishman’s struggles with language abroad


I started travelling late in 2009 and like a lot of Englishmen I had had very little experience with foreign languages, especially when compared to other Europeans. There isn’t an emphasis on learning languages in the UK like in other countries. Also, I would be lying if I said I didn´t have a slightly bullish attitude to foreign languages, in that I expected everyone else to speak enough English for me to get by. Travelling throughout India I found communication to be a mixed bag. Most people spoke good English in the southern states (it is the official language) but up north it was either very broken or nonexistent. Getting about wasn’t too hard but it was a shame that due to my lack of Hindi I couldn’t form proper friendships with a lot of the great Indians I met. taj

Last March my wife and I holidayed in Japan and it was the first time I came across such a definitive language barrier. The Japanese were wonderfully polite and you could see that they wanted to help when we asked or enquired, but such distinct and different cultures and languages really did stop any true connection through speaking to one another. As you can imagine there was plenty of body language and pointing from our end and plenty of awkward, polite smiles and bowing from theirs!

taj 2 An impression I got from experiencing India and Japan, to some degree, was that they didn’t expect foreign travelers to understand their languages. That didn’t make it any easier getting around, but there was an: “Ok, so I can’t understand you, you can’t understand me, let’s work this out the best we can” attitude that helped.

Coming to Argentina has been by far the biggest eye opener in the language stakes. My wife is Argentine but we never talk in Spanish and so I came to Argentina with very little Spanish vocabulary. I have been fortunate because my wife’s family all speak English well enough, but of course tend to talk Spanish when we are together socially. My bullish attitude of expecting everyone to speak English around me has been well and truly shot down!

I have so far struggled to pick up Spanish which has made it difficult at times. I get the impression that there is an expectation to know Spanish when you want to engage with Argentines (and rightly so!) and so understanding conversational Spanish is all the more important.taj 3

What I’ve learnt when on the road is that if you want to travel and just do the tourist traps then a limited understanding of that country’s language will get you by, just barely. But, just doing the tourist traps means that you are missing a big part of travelling. Going off the beaten track is how to experience a country’s true culture and people, and this requires you to put effort into learning their language.

Adam

Crowdsourcing New Language Skills with Memrise


Looking for a unique and fun way to learn new vocabulary? Memrise is an online learning tool that uses flashcards augmented with mnemonics partly gathered through crowdsourcing and the spacing effect to boost the speed and ease of learning.   memrise

It was founded by Ed Cooke, a Grand Master of Memory, and Greg Detre, a Princeton neuroscientist specializing in the science of memory and forgetting. It works like planting a seed and watering the plant until it has grown into a plant with flowers. After certain periods of time (working alongside the science of how our short, medium and long term memories work) you must water and harvest new seeds to keep learning new vocabulary. You can follow friends and see how they are getting on with their flowers and you gain points which puts you onto a leader board.

It is a great and fun way of learning a new language as well as learning
other things too!

 

 

 

Lunfardo


A los habitantes de Buenos Aires se le conoce mayormente como porteños, por la influencia del puerto en el desarrollo de esta cuidad. Ellos utilizan con frecuencia una jerga peculiar conocida como “lunfardo”, la cual surge de la fusión de lenguas, conocimientos y costumbres, traídas por los inmigrantes. Esta forma de hablar consiste en deformar el propio castellano, tomando palabras de algunos dialectos italianos y de otras lenguas, para luego adaptarlas en un nuevo idioma.

Es un leguaje dinámico y lleno de vida ya que se nutre constantemente de expresiones circunstanciales o improvisadas, renovándose constantemente. Al igual que el tango , nace en el ambiente marginal de los barrios pobres, debido a la convivencia forzada entre el gran caudal de inmigrantes que llegaron durantes las primeras décadas del siglo XX y la población local. Hoy se ha expandido a todos los niveles sociales y es cotidianamente utilizado en diversos ámbitos y situaciones. Lo podemos escuchar frecuentemente en los tangos, en los medios de comunicación y en los escritores más importantes de este país. Hay que mantener completa atención a la hora de escuchar hablar a un porteño, pues su español podría ser bastante complicado. He aquí varios ejemplos…

Algunas expresiones características del español rioplatense:
Opiniones favorables sobre una persona
• “Tiene onda”
• “Es re lindo/a”
• “Es copado/a”

Opiniones negativas sobre una persona
• “Es re mala onda”
• “No me cabe”
• “No me lo/a banco”

¡Ojo con los gestos! – Dictionary of Porteños’ Gestures


Cuando nos comunicamos, no sólo usamos las palabras; también hacemos gestos que pueden tener tanto significado como lo que decimos. Algunos son universales (como por ejemplo el pulgar para arriba), otros significan diferentes cosas en diferentes lugares. Acá, te enseñamos algunos gestos muy útiles para entender a los porteños.

When we talk, we use more than just words. We also do gestures that can be as meaningful as the words we say. Some of them are universal (such us “thumbs up”), some others mean different things in different places.
People from Buenos Aires are known for “speaking with their hands”. You might feel that we are making senseless chaotic movements but many of them are very meaningful and clear among locals.
Here, some of them.

 

 

¡Ojo! – Be careful!/Watch out!
[Pull down your lower eyelid with your index finger.]

 

 

¡Ni la más pálida idea! – I don’t know./I have no clue.[The chin flick: tilt your head back a bit and sweep the back of your fingers forward from under your chin.]

 


¡Ma sí, andá (a cagar)! – Get outta here!
[Throw your arm back toward your head.]

 

 

Montoncito – What the hell are you talking about?!/Just who do you think you are? [Bring all of your fingers and your thumb together with your hand pointing upward. Move your hand up and down at the wrist.]

 

 

¡Hambre! – You’re totally in the dark, out of it. You don’t know what time it is. [Bite your lower lip with your upper teeth and say: “mmmh!”]

 

 

Fuente: http://www.eniedespaniol.com.ar/blog/44/ojo-con-los-gestos-dictionary-of-portenos-gestures

Profesores de español: listado de recursos online interesante!


Hello Spanish teachers! Salut, professeurs d’espagnol! Oi professores de espanhol!
Buscando material interesante para nuestros cursos vía skype encontré este listado con recursos interesantes para los que dictamos clase. Espero les resulte útil!

http://www.educacion.gob.es/exterior/centros/albuquerque/es/documentos-pdf/Recursosenlaweb.pdf

Spanish group course in action - Palermo Buenos Aires

Spanish school in action - Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina