Eating in Buenos Aires


Eating in BA when bringing dollars into the country can be very affordable. The city is full of quality eating but at first glance can seem limited to steak houses (parillas) and pizza joints. With a city the size of BA every taste is catered to, but it is certainly true that the population’s Italian heritage means a lot of pizza, pasta and pastries. On just about any street corner you will find family run restaurants serving typically heavy, Italian inspired food.

 

steak

A veggie nightmare…

Before coming to Argentina I was under the impression that it would be eating steak for lunch and dinner. My wife (Argentine) had also made a big deal of the quality of meat available, and rightly so. We holidayed in Mina Calvero and the butcher there would prepare our cut of meat straight from the beast. It was great to see and the quality was incredible, a far stretch from what we get back in the UK. Unfortunately with the high inflation the country is experiencing, steak twice a day isn’t an option for everyone.

For those who are staying long term, supermarket shopping will quickly become the most cost effective option. Disco, Jumbo and Carrefour are the major players, all with similar pricing. What becomes evident, when coming from the UK, is the lack of anything Asian or Indian. You can also still spend a fortune on goods that are normally very cheap,  if you are not careful.
They also don’t seem to have a discounted or “buy one get one free” culture, or a dedicated cheap brand like we have back home. Instead they have a discount coupon policy and let you pay your weekly shops over the course of a month. A lot of what is sold in the supermarkets is produced in Argentina and again works out to be the most cost effective way to feed yourself, as what they do import can be way over-priced and usually not of a quality worth justifying.

 

 Empanadas…Like Cornish pasties.

empanadas

 

Those on a budget will find the abundance of fruit and veg shops around the city the best way to eat cheap. They are usually better value compared to the supermarkets and a great way to support the local-man. Equally bakeries can be a cheap way to eat and of great quality.

 

 

 Mmmm…gelato!

Lastly, those with a sweet tooth will not fail to miss the vast amount of ice cream parlors (heladerias) around the city. The ice cream is great here, just make sure you like chocolate and Dulce de Leche flavours…

ice creamWhich brings us to Dulce de Leche. Like some best kept culinary secret, it’s the one Argentine product that should be readily available worldwide, but isn’t. A milk based caramel that the Argentines use in just about everything sweet, it’s perfect. It’s good, promise.

Adam

Traveling in Argentina by bus or plane


Argentina is a beautiful country and has so many things to see! If you have some time outside of your classes at lvstudio, go and travel around Argentina! Whether it’s Salta, Jujuy, Cordoba, and Iguazu in the North or El Calafate, Bariloche, and Ushuaia in the South,  it’s all worth seeing! You can travel through Argentina two ways: by bus or by plane.

Do you want to take the bus ? airplane bus

Argentina has an excellent bus network. Buses here are surprisingly comfortable. The providers offer three different services depending on the number of stops and type of seats: Regular, Semi-cama (semi-bed), and Cama (bed), with Cama being similar to an airline’s airplane bus seatbusiness class. This last one also includes meals, while the others don’t serve food unless you buy it yourself in advance. If you have a long way to go, overnight buses are the way to go. They save you a night’s accommodations and keep the daylight hours for pleasure. Hundreds of bus companies serve the different regions with different classes. Check your destination on www.plataforma10.com and compare the prices of the different companies!

 

Or do you prefer taking a plane?airplane

Travel by air is becoming more popular due to the size of the country. Every province in Argentina has its own airport. Flying with certain airlines can be financially comparable or even cheaper than covering the same distance by bus. Demand is heavy and flights, especially to Patagonian destinations in summer, are often booked well in advance. So if you know your dates and destination, take a look at http://www.despegar.com.ar/ and compare the different companies.

 

Still have questions? Ask in lvstudio at the front desk and we will be happy to help you!

An Englishman’s struggles with language abroad


I started travelling late in 2009 and like a lot of Englishmen I had had very little experience with foreign languages, especially when compared to other Europeans. There isn’t an emphasis on learning languages in the UK like in other countries. Also, I would be lying if I said I didn´t have a slightly bullish attitude to foreign languages, in that I expected everyone else to speak enough English for me to get by. Travelling throughout India I found communication to be a mixed bag. Most people spoke good English in the southern states (it is the official language) but up north it was either very broken or nonexistent. Getting about wasn’t too hard but it was a shame that due to my lack of Hindi I couldn’t form proper friendships with a lot of the great Indians I met. taj

Last March my wife and I holidayed in Japan and it was the first time I came across such a definitive language barrier. The Japanese were wonderfully polite and you could see that they wanted to help when we asked or enquired, but such distinct and different cultures and languages really did stop any true connection through speaking to one another. As you can imagine there was plenty of body language and pointing from our end and plenty of awkward, polite smiles and bowing from theirs!

taj 2 An impression I got from experiencing India and Japan, to some degree, was that they didn’t expect foreign travelers to understand their languages. That didn’t make it any easier getting around, but there was an: “Ok, so I can’t understand you, you can’t understand me, let’s work this out the best we can” attitude that helped.

Coming to Argentina has been by far the biggest eye opener in the language stakes. My wife is Argentine but we never talk in Spanish and so I came to Argentina with very little Spanish vocabulary. I have been fortunate because my wife’s family all speak English well enough, but of course tend to talk Spanish when we are together socially. My bullish attitude of expecting everyone to speak English around me has been well and truly shot down!

I have so far struggled to pick up Spanish which has made it difficult at times. I get the impression that there is an expectation to know Spanish when you want to engage with Argentines (and rightly so!) and so understanding conversational Spanish is all the more important.taj 3

What I’ve learnt when on the road is that if you want to travel and just do the tourist traps then a limited understanding of that country’s language will get you by, just barely. But, just doing the tourist traps means that you are missing a big part of travelling. Going off the beaten track is how to experience a country’s true culture and people, and this requires you to put effort into learning their language.

Adam

How to Avoid the Dreaded Comma Splice



semicolonPirates have nasty attitudes, this is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

What’s wrong with this sentence? Most style manuals agree that there is a problem here. When two independent clauses are connected with a comma without a conjunction, a comma splice is the result. An independent clause is a clause that can stand alone as a sentence. There are several ways to resolve this situation. The easiest way to fix the problem is to separate the two clauses into two sentences.

Pirates have nasty attitudes. This is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

Another way to resolve this problem would be to combine the two clauses with a conjunction such as or, but, or and. The addition of the conjunction makes one of the clauses dependent on the other.

Pirates have nasty attitudes, but this is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

A third way to fix the problem is to use a semicolon. This is only possible if the clauses are independent. Semicolons are frequently misused so be careful with them.

Pirates have nasty attitudes; this is frequently the result of wearing their pants too tight.

For a clear and succinct description of how to use a semicolon, visit The Oatmeal

 

 

Crowdsourcing New Language Skills with Memrise


Looking for a unique and fun way to learn new vocabulary? Memrise is an online learning tool that uses flashcards augmented with mnemonics partly gathered through crowdsourcing and the spacing effect to boost the speed and ease of learning.   memrise

It was founded by Ed Cooke, a Grand Master of Memory, and Greg Detre, a Princeton neuroscientist specializing in the science of memory and forgetting. It works like planting a seed and watering the plant until it has grown into a plant with flowers. After certain periods of time (working alongside the science of how our short, medium and long term memories work) you must water and harvest new seeds to keep learning new vocabulary. You can follow friends and see how they are getting on with their flowers and you gain points which puts you onto a leader board.

It is a great and fun way of learning a new language as well as learning
other things too!

 

 

 

Fileteado Porteño


fileteado   As iconic as the face of Carlos Gardel, the stylized artistic style of fileteado can be seen throughout Buenos Aires adorning storefronts, buses, taxis and just about anything else that porteños care about. The curled flowers, loops and hand painted swirls that began as a simple decoration for produce carts developed over the years into a way of distinguishing the myriad of buses (colectivos) from their competitors. Now the style is recognized as a unique and disctinctive art form of the city. From plumber’s shops to Milongas, the characteristic flowers, cornucopias, and vivid colors are  more than just a means of filling the free space on signs; they are an art form as distinctive as Buenos Aires itself.

Excellent examples of fileteado can be found when walking around La Boca or outside the Carlos Gardel museum in Abasto. It is not necessary, however, to make a special trip. Just about everywhere you go in the city, you can see hand painted fileteado signs and walls used for advertisements or simply for decoration.  fileteado 2

There are even tours that  will take you around the city to see the best  examples of this unique  art form. Or, if you are  feeling creative, you can  even take a class from a master of fileteado.  Wherever you are in the city, there is a good chance that you can find a beautiful example of this distinctive art within walking distance.

 

 

 

Funky and Fun: Bangalore and Shanghai Dragon, Palermo


Bangalore and Shangai dragon

We are going to be bringing you guys a weekly bar review type thing, because we care about your time in the city, not because we like going to bars *wink*. So as this is the first one, we’re going treat you to two bar reviews; Bangalore and Shanghai Dragon in Palermo. They are similar, as they have the same owner.
They go for the same unique pub style and both pull it off.

Shangai Dragon

Walking into Shangai Dragon, you really feel like your in pub in east London. The layout, the furniture and the indian influenced menu, it is not your typical Buenos Aires bar. Both have good taste in music and dabble in a bit of everything from old jazz to more recent indie rock.

Bangalore

In Bangalore you have two options for food, bar and restaurant. Both are amazing and it all depends on what your in the mood for quick bite before going out or a nice meal with friends.

Both are perfect pre game bars, although it can be difficult to find a seat in Bangalore so get down early.

¿Qué se come en Buenos Aires?


Guess what I have come to terms with?

Finding a budget to sample the treats at the most hip and up and coming restaurants in Buenos Aires is hard to do. Inflation is tricky; I used to think I lived in a place that enjoyed the thrills and “comfort” of any cosmopolitan city at a fraction of the cost, but upon my numerous few attempts to harness my inner Anthony Bourdain, I have emptied my wallet. I am proud of this town’s knack for new ethnic samplings; Buenos Aires is becoming increasingly more diverse, what with Scandinavian chic restaurants sprouting up and a sudden tolerance for real Latin spice and Pan Asian delicacies, but – and you knew there would be a but, if you don’t have the budget and are willing to put your concerns with a girlish figure aside, just gobble up cheese and bread. It is cheap in Buenos Aires.

Back to Anthony Bourdain. I think he would be proud of me. Why? He would tell us a million things most of the posh establishments I froth over are doing wrong, and would likely prefer to revel in a nice slice of fuggazetta or carne suave empanada from any random pizzeria. Porteños make these their staples, so I guess I will too. Meat (no, not from cabaña de las lilas, I’m talking a milanesa a la napolitana), empanadas, pastas (gnocchi a la sorrentina) and pizzas (wood burning oven please!), is what I know as an expat in Argentina.

Expats en Buenos Aires


Hacé clic para ver nuestros queridos EXPATS en LV Studio

Nuestros grupos de expats van avanzando muy rápido en sus estudios de castellano, spanish, español, porteño / lunfardo / modismos / chamuyo, TODO lo que uno necesita para vivir en Buenos Aires y hablar fluidamente con los demás! Los felicitamos por su esfuerzo y sus ganas de resforzar un segundo idioma.

Si sos Expat en Buenos Aires, veni a vernos en LV Studio a resforzar tu español!

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cursos de inglés, cursos de portugués, cursos de francés en palermo, abasto y flores

cursos de inglés, cursos de portugués, cursos de francés en palermo, abasto y flores

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